Wednesday, April 3rd at 9:00 PM in the RockYard
 


Thursday, April 4th at 9:00 PM in the RockYard
 
Since 1975, they’ve sold over 15 million albums, built a classic catalog of hits, and played more than 8,000 ferocious live shows. They broke records with their 50 Dates/50 States tour, delivered landmark performances at Live Aid and on SNL, and became mainstays of radio, MTV and stages worldwide for more than two generations. Through it all, they’ve remained one of the most consistent – and consistently passionate – progenitors of blues-based rock in pop culture history.

For the past 45 years, it’s been very good to be George Thorogood & The Destroyers. And in 2019, their Good To Be Bad Tour: 45 Years Of Rock will prove why like never before.

“If you’re content, you may as well be dead.” George laughs with his familiar rasp. “I think everyone has thoughts about retiring, but the phone keeps ringing. You want me and The Destroyers to come to your town, set up our gear, wear some badass clothes and play ‘Who Do You Love?’ End of conversation. Let’s rock!”

For Thorogood and his longtime band – Jeff Simon (drums, percussion), Bill Blough (bass guitar), Jim Suhler (rhythm guitar) and Buddy Leach (saxophone) – the power to rock audiences has been both battle cry and creed since forming in 1974. “It wasn’t about the amount of people we drew, but rather the impression we made,” George remembers. “I asked myself, ‘Are we reaching them? Do they want more?’ And we knew from the very first set that we had something special.”

It’s on stage that George & The Destroyers flip the switch nightly, delivering what The Toledo Blade calls a “gut-bustin’, guitar-wailin’, face-meltin’, fiery-tempoed, take-no-prisoners, good old-fashioned lunch-bucket rock & roll show” that includes their signature hits “Get A Haircut”, “I Drink Alone”, “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”, “Move It On Over”, “Who Do You Love” and the definitive badass anthem “Bad To The Bone”, along with several surprises. “It’s been a constant evolution to make the show all killer, no filler,” explains 43-year Destroyers’ bassist Bill Blough. “Something still inherently clicks the second we step on stage. We feel the audience’s energy and the show just explodes.”

But after 45 years of rock – and no signs of stopping – can Thorogood point to what continues to make it all matter? “My highlight is every night when I walk on that stage and play our hits for those happy people,” he says. “At the end of the show, the audience is smiling, I don’t see any police and everyone got their money’s worth.”

More importantly, is it still good to be bad? George Thorogood instantly flashes that huge grin. “You bet it is,” he says. ”We’ll always be the baddest band in the land. Expect our best on this tour, because that’s what you’re gonna get.”


Friday, April 5th at 9:00 PM in the RockYard
 
In order to know where you’re headed, you have to recognize where you’re from. So when it came time to begin working on their sixth full-length album, Us And The Night [Republic Records], Grammy Award®-nominated multiplatinum Mississippi rock band 3 Doors Down channeled a familiar feeling.

“We all missed the excitement of making our first album,” says singer Brad Arnold. “As you continue creating records, it can become sort of mechanical, and you start taking everything too seriously. However, for Us And The Night, we were all on the same page about just wanting to have a good time in the studio. That created a great vibe. I don’t think we’ve ever felt this unified as a band in our entire career. That’s why the album sounds like it does.”

In late 2014, 3 Doors Down—Brad Arnold [lead vocals], Chris Henderson [lead and rhythm guitar], Greg Upchurch [drums], Chet Roberts [lead and rhythm guitar], and Justin Biltonen [bass]— wrapped up a marathon of touring that included the cycles for 2011’s Time of My Life, which debuted at #3 on the Billboard Top 200, and The Greatest Hits, a year later. Along the way, they welcomed Chet and Justin into the fold in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Us And The Night would make for their first studio experience together and formally open up a new chapter for the group.

“The creativity between the five of us hadn’t been tapped yet,” explains Chris. “That made the whole process really interesting because everybody was bringing different ideas to the table. The boundaries totally opened up. Chet and Justin kept pushing and pushing, and none of us wanted to stop.”

The guys holed up in Chris’s own Rivergate Studios in Nashville, TN and dove into extremely collaborative sessions—which even saw Greg writing for the first time. As a result, the sonic palette started to expand with producer Matt Wallace [Maroon 5, Train, Faith No More] behind the board.

“Matt was a great coach,” continues Chris. “We got out of our comfort zone and started to approach the music from a different angle. We’d use synths or try different styles of riffs. That made everybody a little uncomfortable in the best way. It really worked.”

“This couldn’t be just another 3 Doors Down record,” adds Brad. “It needed to be an album that made people take a second look and listen.”

That’s exactly what the first single “In The Dark” does. With a raucous, raw, and rowdy riff, the track shows an unexpected and undeniable side of the band, culminating during the chorus, “She likes to do it in the dark.” “

We’ve never had a sexy, playful song,” smiles Brad. “There was definitely a place for it. It’s about seeing that girl across the room. I initially played the idea for my wife, and she smiled, ‘I like that.’ I knew we had to go for it!” “

Living In Your Hell” teeters between a drum stomp and robust guitars before an arena-size refrain. “It’s about broken promises,” Brad goes on. “So many people tell you they have your back, and it’s just lie. You end up living in hell from their broken promises.”

Meanwhile, “The Broken” delivers an immediately unshakable chant complete with gang vocal, handclaps, and a swinging synth melody. “It’s a call to the youth,” exclaims the singer. “It’s not about taking everything down; it’s about building everything up. This is an empowering call-toarms for the next generation to take back the world. Use your voice.”

3 Doors Down first found their own voice in 1995. It’s only gotten louder over the past two decades. Everything kicked off with their 2000 debut, The Better Life. The album went six-times platinum and introduced the world to their now-classic “Kryptonite.” Their fan base continued to grow with 2002’s triple-platinum Away from the Sun—which yielded the smashes “When I’m Gone” and “Here Without You.” Both 2005’s platinum-certified Seventeen Days and 3 Doors Down [2008] bowed at #1 on the Billboard Top 200 followed by Time of My Life’s #3 debut in 2011. In between countless sold out shows, the guys notched three Grammy Award® nods, scored two American Music Awards, and received a total of five BMI Pop Awards, including an award for Brad for BMI “Songwriter of the Year.”

2003 saw the group begin a tradition of giving back in a big way with the launch of their The Better Life Foundation [TBLF]. The organization has lived up to its name by giving as many children as possible a better life and supporting Center of the Prevention of Child Abuse, Habitat for Humanity, and various other charities. Its annual concert has hosted everyone from Lynyrd Skynyrd and Sara Evans to Staind, Shinedown, and Alter Bridge.

Unified, unbreakable, and undeniable, 3 Doors Down remain poised for their boldest moment yet. This promise even stands encapsulated within the very title.

“Us And the Night means, ‘Let’s just keep going until it’s just us left,’” Brad leaves off. “It’s an ‘us against them’ song. The world’s problems don’t have to stop us. Let’s forget about them, stop worrying, and enjoy the ride together. It’s an invitation to fans everywhere to do the same.”


Saturday, April 6th at 9:00 PM in the RockYard
 
‘When Legends Rise’ Bio, 2018 According to Greek mythology, the phoenix absorbs new life through rising from the ashes of its predecessor.

By the same token, we tear down the relics of the past in order to make way for the innovations of the future. As every rebirth requires reinvention, GODSMACK--Sully Erna [vocals, guitar], Tony Rombola [guitar], Robbie Merrill [bass], and Shannon Larkin [drums]--continue a similar cycle on their seventh full-length and debut for BMG, When Legends Rise.

 The multiplatinum four-time GRAMMY® Award-nominated Boston bastion of hard rock raises its voice louder than ever on their first album in four years.

“You’ve got to burn it down to build it up,” affirms Erna. “When Legends Rise is a metaphor. Life can get challenging at times. It can knock you onto the ground. However, if you reach inside of yourself, find that inner strength, and rise up again, you’ll flourish. Over the past few years, I went through a really tough time, but I learned this firsthand. Coming out on the other side, we’re going to do this bigger and better than we ever have. We’re ready to work.”

Truth is, the members of GODSMACK have never been afraid to put in the work…

Like the city they call home, these musicians speak louder, fight harder, and grow stronger each day. Through an uncompromising attitude and uncanny knack for a hummable hook, they quietly became one of modern rock’s most reliable and resonant institutions. Against all odds, the boys have broken one ceiling after another. They’ve landed seven number one singles on both the Billboard Mainstream & Active Rock charts. Most notably, they’ve earned 21 Top 10 hits at Active Rock--the most of any act since February 1999. Joining a prestigious club that includes Van Halen, U2, Metallica, Dave Matthews Band, and Linkin Park, they debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top 200 three consecutive times. Not to mention, they’ve sold over 20 million albums worldwide, garnered four GRAMMY® nods, and won “Rock Artist of the Year” at the Billboard Music Awards.

Following a marathon two-year tour cycle reunderlining their position as one of rock’s most explosive acts, the band made a conscious decision to approach writing from a different angle. For the first time, they welcomed collaborators into the process, including John Feldmann, Erik Ron, and longtime friend and Sevendust guitarist Clint Lowery.

As a result, the sonic palette expanded dramatically, while preserving the guttural GODSMACK grit synonymous with the group.

“I really wanted to open up this vein and reach for something fresh,” admits Erna. “Working together with these guys really got me going. I’m one of those people you can give a grain of sand to, and I’ll make a mountain out of it. A little push opened the floodgates. Their contributions allowed me to explore new melody styles. Personally and professionally, we’ve matured a lot. It was time for that kind of expansion.”

So impressed by Ron’s demos, Erna invited him back to GODSMACK Headquarters in Derry, New Hampshire in order to co-produce the 11 songs with him comprising When Legends Rise. Together, they unlocked an epic urgency evidenced within the title track and album opener.

A massive drum march and high-energy riffing give way to an empowering chant, “When ashes fall, legends rise.”

“I went through a pretty intense breakup,” the frontman recalls. “It wasn’t so much the breakup that banged me up as it was the aftermath. My eyes opened to things that were going on around me with family, friends, and people who I realized were bogging me down with drama and negativity. I made a conscious choice to shut it all off. Instead of leaning on another girl or alcohol to get me through it, I processed the pain organically this time. There’s an overarching theme of eliminating negativity and being guilt-free about it. When you build yourself back up in this way, that’s when the magic happens.”

The magic carries through the first single “Bulletproof.” Hinging on a massive and muscular groove, Erna’s voice takes hold during hypnotic verses before snapping into a stadium-size chant that’s impossible to shake.

“This addresses everything I went through head-on,” he goes on. “How many times can you endure this before you create that emotional wall? You don’t allow anyone else back in to potentially hurt you. When you’re betrayed, it kills. It’s like you can’t move forward without this person, because you were so attached. Once it goes away, you gain that strength and independence again. People see that glow when you’re on the rebound. They see you shine. You’ve enabled me to be bulletproof. You’re going to bounce off. I’m certainly not letting you back into this f***er.”

A wah-wah cry bleeds into the album’s most seismic and show-stopping refrain during “Unforgettable.” Everything culminates on a choir of local middle schoolers conducted by Erna--like his own “Another Brick in the Wall.”

“When I heard the melody in my head, it felt like a big singalong or like The Patriots could hopefully run out onto the field to it,” he laughs. “I’ve been working with this organization called C.A.T.S.--Community Alliance for Teen Safety--since like 2003. They put me in touch with this amazing group of twenty kids. They came to the studio, we got a bunch of pizza, and they sang it brilliantly. It’s really exciting.”

Elsewhere, piano and strings drive the heartfelt “Under Your Scars” as “Every Part of Me” trudges forward on ironclad intensity. Spurned by a jam session with Lowery, “Eye of the Storm” closes out this journey with a barrage of distortion, haunting vocals, a hypnotic solo, and the sound of roaring thunder.

“If you listen to this as a body of work, it ends with the sound of something to come,” grins Erna. “Who knows? It might just be another beginning for us.”

Regardless of what’s on the horizon, GODSMACK rise like never before here.

“When you listen to this album, just have some fun with it,” he leaves off. “That’s what music should do at the end of the day. There’s no doubt about it, this is a rock record through and through. This is also a Godsmack record.”